The Colors of Suspense

Catching up With Horror/Science Fiction Writer and colorful crafter Lani Longshore…. Hi, Lani. Your work is truly original. But everyone has their influences. Which mystery, thriller, suspense or horror writer has had the most influence upon you? In brief, why? Every author I read influences me in some way, but let’s start with first ones […]

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In Character – A Blog Hop

  Meet Anna Sterling. Anna is a hardworking, loyal, unmarried woman doing what it takes to help provide for her working class family in 1919. My ideas about Anna, her time, and a stranger-than-fiction historical rarity grew into my story “Bitter Sweets.” I will be discussing Anna today in my section of a character-centered blog […]

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Gear Up for All Hallow's Read with Horror Writer Eden Royce

My favorite season of spooky literacy, All Hallow’s Read, approaches. It makes perfect sense to a fan of horror fiction that books and Halloween go together like chocolate and…pretty much everything. Haven’t heard of All Hallow’s Read? The movement to give the gift of a scary book (along with all those Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups) […]

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Dark, Sticky Death

“The steel tank of molasses collapsed. A wave of thick, sweet liquid flooded the waterfront and roared into the surrounding streets. At the same time, pieces of metal from the tank hurled into the air, raining down on unsuspecting sailors. The flood of boiled sugarcane syrup soon gushed for block after block. The wave of […]

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Something Wicked This Way Comes

What makes a memorable villain? American novels and films are crawling with devils. (Sometimes literally.) Ghosts linger. Stalkers lurk. And, if you’re a horror fan, it’s all in looking-over-your-shoulder fun. But as a writer, how do you make your villain leave a frightening aftertaste? As I get older, I’m starting to think that the most […]

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Setting Intrigue

              Some of my favorite fictional characters are cities from the past. I feel like Hugo’s Paris, Cheever’s New York and Winterson’s Venice remain so vibrant, exaggerated and well-defined that you miss them like flawed but magnetic old friends. Dennis Lehane’s portraits of pre-gentrification Irish and Italian-American Boston neighborhoods […]

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